coral symbiotic algae calcify ex hospite in partnership

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  • 2020/02/25· A central feature of the coral holobiont is the tripartite interaction between corals, their Symbiodiniaceae partners and associated bacterial assemblages. We recently identified putative ecological links between Symbiodiniaceae and bacterial partners by characterizing the core microbiome associated with 18 strains of Symbiodiniaceae ( Lawson et al., 2018 ).

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  • To investigate heterotrophic protists grazing on Symbiodinium sp., we tested whether the common heterotrophic dinoflagellates Gyrodinium dominans, Gyrodinium moestrupii, Gyrodinium spirale, Oblea rotundata, Oxyrrhis marina, and Polykrikos kofoidii and the ciliates Balanion sp. and Parastrombidinopsis sp. preyed on the free‐living dinoflagellate Symbiodinium sp. (clade E).

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  • Coral symbiotic algae calcify ex hospite in partnership with bacteria Jörg C. Frommlet PNAS USA Plant, plant root and soil microbiome Yeast nitrogen utilization in the phyllosphere during plant lifespan under regulation of autophagy Kosuke Shiraishi Scientific Reports

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  • Frommlet, JC, Sousa, ML, Alves, A, Vieira, SI, Suggett, DJ & Serodio, J 2015, 'Coral symbiotic algae calcify ex hospite in partnership with bacteria', PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE

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  • 2020/01/13· In hospite, Symbiodiniaceae can interact with bacteria present in the coral tissues and the surface mucus layer of the coral (bottom left). Numbers in red represent the typical abundance of bacterial cells in these different

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  • Coral reefs are significant ecosystems. The ecological success of coral reefs relies on not only coral-algal symbiosis but also coral-microbial partnership. However,

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  • The endolithic niche of coral symbionts in reef sands at Lizard Island, Great Barrier Reef, Australia Cláudio Brandão1; Matthew Nitschke2, Cátia Fidalgo1, Hugo Scharfenstein3, David Suggett4, João Serôdio1, Jörg Frommlet1 1 Departmento de Biologia & CESAM, Universidade de Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro, Portugal]

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  • Coral symbiotic algae calcify ex hospite in partnership with bacteria. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 112(19): 6158–6163. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 112(19): 6158–6163.

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  • The magnesium inhibition and arrested phagosome hypotheses: new perspectives on the evolution and ecology of Symbiodinium symbioses

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  • Coral symbiotic algae calcify ex hospite in partnership with bacteria Jörg C. Frommlet PNAS USA Plant, plant root and soil microbiome Yeast nitrogen utilization in the phyllosphere during plant lifespan under regulation of autophagy Kosuke Shiraishi Scientific Reports

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  • of both in and ex hospite zooxanthellae [9–16]. Although several previous studies have experimentally controlled for host and environmental factors, no study to date has compared the performance of coral symbioses with varying

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  • E. Shoguchi-1 +$(1'-Symbiodinium "+$ 0 Ϥ s R :Èî hÀÈ ÀÈqelpK]fVHRi[VX R / ¢ ç D Æ z a Eiichi Shoguchi Genome evolutions in symbiotic dinoflagellate Symbiodinium and parasitic apicomplexans Key words: alveolates, Apicomplexa

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  • 2020/01/13· In hospite, Symbiodiniaceae can interact with bacteria present in the coral tissues and the surface mucus layer of the coral (bottom left). Numbers in red represent the typical abundance of bacterial cells in these different

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  • Coral symbiotic algae calcify ex hospite in partnership with bacteria. Frommlet JC, Sousa ML, Alves A, Vieira SI,Suggett DJ

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  • The supply of metabolites from symbionts to scleractinian corals is crucial to coral health. Members of the Symbiodiniaceae can enhance coral calcification by providing photosynthetically fixed carbon (PFC) and energy, whereas dinitrogen (N2)-fixing bacteria can provide additional nutrients such as diazotrophically-derived nitrogen (DDN) that sustain coral productivity especially when

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  • However, the endosymbiotic phase within Symbiodinium life history is inherently tied to a more cryptic free-living (ex hospite) Dinoflagellates of the genus Symbiodinium are commonly recognized as invertebrate endosymbionts that are of central importance for the functioning of coral reef ecosystems.

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  • Coral symbiotic algae calcify ex hospite in partnership with bacteria. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 112(19): 6158–6163. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 112(19): 6158–6163.

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  • The endolithic niche of coral symbionts in reef sands at Lizard Island, Great Barrier Reef, Australia Cláudio Brandão1; Matthew Nitschke2, Cátia Fidalgo1, Hugo Scharfenstein3, David Suggett4, João Serôdio1, Jörg Frommlet1 1 Departmento de Biologia & CESAM, Universidade de Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro, Portugal]

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  • 2015/05/12· In symbiosis, Symbiodiniumspp. provide their hosts with photosynthates in exchange for host-derived metabolites, and in hospiteof scleractinian corals they also enhance coral calcification, the biomineralization process that provides the structural framework for the entire coral reef

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  • Frommlet, JC, Sousa, ML, Alves, A, Vieira, SI, Suggett, DJ & Serodio, J 2015, 'Coral symbiotic algae calcify ex hospite in partnership with bacteria', PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE

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  • Coral symbiotic algae calcify ex hospite in partnership with bacteria JC Frommlet, ML Sousa, A Alves, SI Vieira, DJ Suggett, J Serôdio Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 112 (19), 6158-6163, 2015 29 2015 28

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  • 341 Flicker Light Effects on Photosynthesis of Symbiotic Algae in the Reef-Building Coral Acropora digitifera (Cnidaria: Anthozoa: Scleractinia)1 Takashi Nakamura2,3 and Hideo Yamasaki2,4 Abstract: Reef-building corals inhabit a

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  • 2020/03/13· Frommlet JC, Sousa ML, Alves A, Vieira SI, Suggett DJ, Serôdio J. Coral symbiotic algae calcify ex hospite in partnership with bacteria. Proc Natl

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  • A recent advance in calcification for coral symbiotic algae demonstrated that free-living Symbiodinium in culture could form algal-microbial partnership, which facilitated the Symbiodinium

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  • The onset of microbial associations in the coral Pocillopora meandrina (2009) ISME J, 3 (6), pp. 685-699; Sharp, KH, Distel, D, Paul, VJ., Diversity and dynamics of bacterial communities in early life stages of the Caribbean coral

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  • ex-hospite in monocultures, which remains a primary platform to understand their biology and the complex role they play in coral functioning (Warner & Suggett 2016). However, these cultures inherently contain abundant

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  • 2020/03/13· Frommlet JC, Sousa ML, Alves A, Vieira SI, Suggett DJ, Serôdio J. Coral symbiotic algae calcify ex hospite in partnership with bacteria. Proc Natl

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  • Coral reef ecosystems rely on stable symbiotic relationship between the dinoflagellate Symbiodinium spp. and host cnidarian animals. The collapse of such symbiosis could cause coral

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  • Coral symbiotic algae calcify ex hospite in partnership with bacteria more by Artur Alves Dinoflagellates of the genus Symbiodinium are commonly recognized as invertebrate endosymbionts that are of central importance for the functioning of coral reef ecosystems.

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  • However, the endosymbiotic phase within Symbiodinium life history is inherently tied to a more cryptic free-living (ex hospite) phase that remains largely unexplored. Here we show that free-living Symbiodinium spp. in culture

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  • Coral symbiotic algae calcify ex hospite in partnership with bacteria. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 112(19): 6158–6163. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 112(19): 6158–6163.

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  • Coral symbiotic algae calcify ex hospite in partnership with bacteria Jörg C. Frommleta,b,1, Maria L. Sousaa,b, Artur Alvesa,b, Sandra I. Vieirac,d,e, David J. Suggettf, and João Serôdioa,b aDepartment of Biology,bCenter for Environmental and Marine Studies (CESAM),cAutonomous Section of Health Sciences,dCenter for Cell Biology, and

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  • Coral symbiotic algae calcify ex hospite in partnership with bacteria JC Frommlet, ML Sousa, A Alves, SI Vieira, DJ Suggett, J Serôdio Proceedings of the

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  • 2015/05/01· Dinoflagellates of the genus Symbiodinium are commonly recognized as invertebrate endosymbionts that are of central importance for the functioning of coral reef ecosystems. However, the endosymbiotic phase within Symbiodinium life history is inherently tied to a more cryptic free-living (ex hospite) phase that remains largely unexplored. Here we show that free-living Symbiodinium spp. in

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  • 2004/08/30· Moreover, the dye-tracer measurements clearly indicate that ROS produced in the algae leaks out of the cells. If this phenomenon happens in hospite, ROS would be transferred directly to the animal host, inducing a physiological).

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  • Title: Coral symbiotic algae calcify ex hospite in partnership with bacteria Publication Type: J Source: PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA Document Type:

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  • 2015/04/27· Coral calcification stems from the coral itself but in symbiotic (hermatypic) species is enhanced by the photosynthetic activity of their symbionts through a process termed " light-enhanced

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  • 2015/05/12· Coral symbiotic algae calcify ex hospite in partnership with bacteria View ORCID Profile Jörg C. Frommlet,Maria L. Sousa,Artur Alves,Sandra I. Vieira,

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  • Coral symbiotic algae calcify ex hospite in partnership with bacteria more by Artur Alves Dinoflagellates of the genus Symbiodinium are commonly recognized as invertebrate endosymbionts that are of central importance for the functioning of coral reef ecosystems.

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